The Difference Between Moms and Dads….

My 11 year old Spencer often thinks he has life all figured out. And sometimes his ‘thinking out loud’ comments completely crack me up.

For example….

Yesterday, he announced he noticed a distinct difference between moms and dads. You see, I was urging him to put on his seat belt when I picked him up from his day at the Homeschool academy.

“Why do I have to wear it?” he questioned.

“Spencer, because I love you and don’t want you to get hurt if we have an accident. Besides, it is against the law not to wear one,” I replied.

“See!” he said. “Moms and dads are so different! You moms get all mushy and care about us getting hurt and following the rules and laws like good citizens. Dads are so different.”

When I asked him why he thought that, he quipped, “Because, when dad tells me to put on my seat belt and I ask him why I have to, he doesn’t go all mushy, he just says cause he doesn’t want to pay the $75 fine if we are caught by the cops!”

Happy Weekend,


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  • WILL YU WRITE BACK 2 ME IM LEARNIN HOW TO TXT tlk MY DAUGHTERS AND GRANDAUGHTERS ARE TEACHIN ME LOL OMG TTYL BRB ( LAUGH OUT LOUD, TALK TO YOU LATER, BE RIGHT BACK.)

  • i love my mom and my dad they are old but its ok they are 102 yrs old haha NO REALLY im 80 yrs old i love this website its so prettty i love the colors pink, brown, and blue well i got to go feed my cat by!
    Isabella krothe.

  • karen

    I think my son ( 7yo) will probably say something like that to me also in the future……..because frequently he gives me a look like PLEASE don’t be so mushy………….already !

    Lately i realized more and more that i communicate totally different with the kids than my dh’s………

  • I was amused to hear the differences expressed between boys and girls camp counselor meetings at Camp Berea in New Hampshire. One of the full time staff shook his head as he recalled our meeting that morning to me.

    “You women counselors are so different than what was here last week at boys camp. Women spend five minutes giving one prayer request, crying your way through it, giving every detail about the kid, her family, and the cabin.

    “Last week, when the men were here, prayer requests would sound like this: ‘I have a drug dealer, a kid who thinks about suicide, and someone who has been sexually abused in my cabin. Please pray.’ “